New book from Dr Lydia Zeldenrust

Lydia’s book, The Mélusine Romance in Medieval Europe: Translation, Circulation, and Material Contexts will be released by Boydell & Brewer in January 2020 as part of their Studies in Medieval Romance series.

Here at the CMS, we would like to congratulate Dr Zeldenrust on what looks to be a fantastic contribution to scholarship on the international elements of medieval romance and translation. We look forward to it appearing in the University library in the Spring Term.

You can see more details of the contents (and how to pre-order!) over on the Boydell & Brewer website.

Lydia's book

Hrotsvit of Gandersheim’s ‘Callimachus’

Earlier this summer, the CMS theatre group The Lords of Misrule, put on a performance of Hrotsvit of Gandersheim’s ‘Callimachus’ at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Directed by Nicola Peard, the free performance took place on Wednesday 3 July in Beech Grove Plaza, and was blessed by good weather and an interested crowd.

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Photo credit: Leeds IMC

Written by the 10th-century cannoness Hrotsvit of Gandersheim, Callimachus tells the story of a lustful pagan’s conversion and redemption.

Hrotsvit’s works are something of a favourite for Lords, having formed the focus of multiple past productions; but the group also perform works adapted from or inspired by Old Norse and Old English literature, as well as some completely original productions (for example, their latest production: Upstaged! based on the event of the York Mystery Plays).

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Photo credit: Leeds IMC

You can find out about The Lords of Misrule from their Facebook page, or their Twitter.

The International Medieval Congress this year also saw a performance by another CMS PhD student, Alana Bennett: ‘Romanz-reding on the Bok’: An Evening of Performative Reading.

This event, which took place on Tuesday 2 July, saw Alana undertake a performative reading of Sir Eglamour of Artois, a Middle English romance found in three so-called ‘household manuscripts’. Alana’s PhD research focusses on reading practices, and this performance invited attendees to experience a medieval text a little bit differently: in a way that explored the interplay of text, space, sensory experience, and material culture.

King’s Manor Apricot Jam

Those are four words I never thought I’d see together, but it’s true! The King’s Manor has a resident apricot tree that fruits every few years or so, and this year we got lucky enough to have a bumper crop!

Apricot Jam

And when life gives you apricots… well, make apricot jam.

This fabulous specimen was made by one of our* PhD students, Catherine-Rose Hailstone.

 

*Actually a History PhD student, but Catherine, like many of the medieval single-discipline PhD students, works in our PhD workroom at King’s Manor and is a vital member of the King’s Manor CMS community.

Congratulations Gary!

The Centre would like to congratulate Gary Brannan on his recent promotion to Keeper of Archives and Special Collections at the Borthwick Institute for Archives here at the University.

Our students primarily encounter Gary as one of our tutors in Palaeography (which we hope he still has time to be!), but his primary role (since 2014) has been as the Access Archivist at the Borthwick. Just recently, Gary had been acting Keeper of the Archives before the official appointment this month.

And if you needed more proof that York is a dangerously difficult city to get away from for medievalists, Gary also completed his undergraduate degree in History here at York before heading for his career in Archives!

Gary’s new responsibilities will include leadership of the Borthwick Institute, the Rare Books Collection, University Art Collection, and the York Minster library service based at the Old Palace (behind the Minster).

If you would like to know more about Gary’s work, or the Borthwick Institute itself, you can view his staff profile and the Institute’s homepage. You can also find Gary on Twitter @gbrannanarchive.