John Arnold, ‘Lordship, Violence and Very Small Churches in Southern France, c. 1000-1200’ – The York Medieval Lecture Spring Term, 2018

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John Arnold, ‘Lordship, Violence and Very Small Churches in Southern France, c. 1000-1200’

The York Medieval Lecture 2018, Tuesday 13 February at 5:30pm in K/133

John Arnold is a cultural historian of medieval religion, with particular interests in gender, affect, and the theory of history-writing. He was appointed as Professor of Medieval History at the University of Cambridge in 2016, having previously worked at Birkbeck, University of London and the University of East Anglia. He has been editor of the journal Cultural and Social History, and currently sits on the editorial board of Past & Present.

John has strong ties with the University of York, having studied here as for his undergraduate degree, and in particular with the Centre for Medieval Studies, where he completed his PhD. (Not only was John supervised for his doctorate by a current York medievalist – Prof. Pete Biller – but has since supervised the PhD of another, Tom Johnson!) John’s doctoral research on the inquisition of the Cathar heresy in southern France formed the foundation of his book, Inquisition and Power: Catharism and the Confessing Subject in Medieval Languedoc (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001), as well as many subsequent articles on subjects including textual power, orality and literacy, and the history of emotions.

While John’s core interest lies in the history of medieval religion, he has also written widely on what it means to do history in the present today, as, for example, in his first book, History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2000), and his later What is Medieval History? (Polity, 2008). His most recent published project continues in this vein, in a co-edited volume (with Matthew Hilton and Jan Rüger) on the intellectual legacy of Eric Hobsbawm: History after Hobsbawm: Writing the Past for the Twenty-First Century, co-edited with (Oxford University Press, 2018).

John’s current research, however, has seen him return to the south of France. Along with Pete Biller, he has recently published a source-book for the Manchester Medieval Sources series, Heresy and Inquisition in France, c. 1200-c. 1300 (Manchester University Press, February 2015). And he is currently completing a monograph on the making of lay religion in southern France, c. 1000-1350 – the research for which forms the basis of his talk at York.

Medieval Bake-Off (5 December 2017)

Students, staff, and CMS alumni gathered in King’s Manor Refectory on Tuesday 5th December for the annual Christmas Bake-Off competition. As the judging got underway, attendees enjoyed refreshments including mulled wine, and medieval carols performed by the CMS choir Cantio Conventus.

We had a fantastic selection of bakes, including a cake representation of The Divine Comedy, multiple illuminated manuscripts, and a delicious “50” cake to celebrate the upcoming 50th Anniversary of the Centre this summer.

The judges, CMS Director Sarah Rees-Jones, Charlie Iffans, Head of Frontline Security, and Dimitris Charalampopoulos, King’s Manor Catering Manager, judged the bakes based on design, taste, and overall excellence, and after comprehensively assessing the offerings, three winners were selected:

  1. Best flavour – Gevulde Speculaas, baked by CMS MA Daphne Slob.
  2. Best design – “Marginally Tasty” Madeira cake with lemon icing, team-baked by Alex Kiddier, Claire Walsh, and Isobel Staton, who are all CMS MA students.
  3. Showstopper –a Chili chocolate “Hellmouth” cake, baked by CMS PhD Alana Bennett.

But it wasn’t just baking on offer, as the event offered a chance to view (and vote on) the posters produced by our current MA students on topics from the core course module. A poster entitled “Pots, Pans, and Punishments” about Hrotsvitha’s Dulcitius took the prize, produced by CMS MA students: Daphne Slob, Isobel Staton, Max Botheras, and Claudia Rosillo. All the posters are now on display in the CMS building.

The CMS Christmas Bake-Off is also the chance to award the Garmonsway Dissertation prize for best MA Dissertation for the previous cohort, and this was awarded to Philippa Carter, for her dissertation on: Immaculate complexions: Skin, Sexuality and Gender in the Middle English Romances, which scored a whopping 95!

As the event wrapped up, Alana Bennett (CMS PhD) continued to serenade us with her hurdy-gurdy, adding to the medieval-themed festivities.

Images courtesy of Harriet Evans, Giacomo Valeri and Lydia Zeldenrust:

 

Antony Bale, ‘Medieval Pilgrims’ Books: Some Evidence, and Problems of Evidence’ (Tuesday 31 October 2017)

It was a pleasure to return to the King’s Manor last month to give a visiting lecture on my current research. I spoke about what I’ve been doing as part of my Leverhulme-funded project Pilgrim Libraries: Books and Reading on the Medieval Routes to Rome and Jerusalem. My paper in York, entitled ‘Medieval Pilgrims’ Books: Some Evidence, and Problems of Evidence’, was very much about research in progress, and I emphasised research as a process – involving experimentation, chance, unpredictable results, and sources that challenge one’s disciplinary training and methodological assumptions.

I presented five case-studies from my research, in a kind of backwards anti-pilgrimage: I started in nineteenth-century Cambridge and worked backwards to eleventh-century crusader Tyre. The pilgrims’ books I presented belonged to

  • Norman Bennet (1867-1961): Jerusalem, c. 1889
  • Louis de Quincampoix (d. c. 1540): Eastern Meditteranean, ?Rhodes/Jerusalem, c. 1520
  • Robert Langton (1470-1524): Santiago, Rome, and Jerusalem, c. 1520
  • Margery Kempe (c. 1373-1439): Jerusalem, Rome, Santiago, Wilsnack, Aachen, and Canterbury, 1413-1430
  • Margaret of Beverley (d. 1215): Jerusalem, Santiago, Rome

All of these pilgrims and their reading are the subject of my ongoing research.

Norman Bennet’s 1880s pilgrimage started at Jaffa, and, as far as we know, followed a standard tour of sites mentioned in the bible. Like most English Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land, Bennet’s journey was concerned with travel to a sacred past, not an itinerary to the interesting places of his present. From the port of Jaffa, Bennett went to Jerusalem, and from Jerusalem he travelled east, into the Judean desert – we know that he visited the site of the Valley of Achor, mentioned in the Book of Joshua (Joshua vii.21-26); he visited Ein-Shemesh, the crusader-era monastery at Wadi Qelt, and the River Cherith (Carit), where the prophet Elijah was said to have been fed by ravens; the Spring of Elisha at Ain Sultan, where Elisha purified the spring with salt, as described in 2 Kings ii:19-22; he visited the Mount of Temptation and the Orthodox monastery at Quarantine, al-Quarantul, near Jericho; he visited Jericho itself; and he seems to have visited Ein Gedi on the Dead Sea.

Bennet’s pilgrimage is relevant to my research because we only know about it thanks to the guide book he took with him, which includes his annotations. This book, which is now held in the British Library in London, was Alexander Howard’s Guide to Jerusalem, a travel-guide for the English-speaking pilgrim, which was printed in London in 1888.

 

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Alexander Howard, Howard’s Guide to Jerusalem (London, 1888) London, British Library E. 102. 010077. Photo: Anthony Bale.

Bennet carried his copy of Howard’s Guide with him, and annotated it, slightly messily, in pencil. His annotations are really fascinating and help us reconstruct the experience of pilgrimage for a nineteenth-century Englishman in Ottoman Palestine.

Bennet commented on worldly concerns – a Pole with an ‘evil countenance’ in Jerusalem, pink lemonade, hot plum pudding that he ate in Jericho – but his jottings also show how the landscape moved him.

The glorious blue of the Dead Sea reflected in a blue mist on the mountains of Benjamin. The mountains of Moab rose solemn & grand with their deep blue sides towering to the white fleece clouds which floated above while to crown all the beautiful azure the sky formed what might be correctly called a background unparalleled in the silence of a heavenly beauty.

Bennet’s book thus has much in common with medieval pilgrims’ annotations in their books, revealing a somewhat personal and intimate script, albeit one that is still highly scripted and mediated, within the framework of pilgrimage.

Pilgrims’ books allow us to glimpse the individual pilgrim within the long history of pilgrimage. Bibliographic work on pilgrims’ reading and writing allows us to situate pilgrims in place and time; we can retrieve the traveller within the history of travel, put pilgrimage into its intellectual and cultural contexts, and also show the constant surprises and variety of pilgrim experiences.

The Lords of Misrule: The Wakefield Mystery Plays

From Thursday 23rd to Saturday 25th November, the CMS Lords of Misrule acting troupe presented the Wakefield Mystery Plays. The production took place at Saint Mary Bishophill junior from 7:00-9:00pm and featured a selection of medieval carols and music by the Lords’ music group Cantio Conventus. Tickets were £6/£4 with concessions.

The play, directed by Emily Hansen, was performed by cast composed largely of this year’s MA cohort who presented scenes from the nativity and Shepherd’s Tale. The production and baking team were headed by Madeline Salzman while the musicians and singers were directed by Alana Bennett.

More details on our next performance scheduled for March 2018 will follow.

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The Lords of Misrule cast, musicians and production team Autumn 2017

If you want to know more about the Lords of Misrule, our future productions or are thinking of joining us then please contact us at: lordsofmisrule@gmail.com.

Visiting Professor (15-30 June) – Professor Sarah McNamer (Georgetown University)

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Dr Sarah McNamer is Associate Professor of English and Medieval Studies. Her primary interest is in the relation between literature and the history of emotion. Her book, Affective Meditation and the Invention of Medieval Compassion, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2010, received the “Book of the Year” award from the Conference on Christianity and Literature. Current projects include a book in progress, The Poetics of Emotion in Middle English Literature, and a critical edition and translation of the short Italian version of the pseudo-Bonaventuran Meditations on the Life of Christ from the unique manuscript likely to reflect the original version of this influential work. The latter will be published in the William and Katherine Devers Series on Dante and Medieval Italian Literature, University of Notre Dame Press, in the fall of 2017.

Dr. McNamer will be visiting the Centre for Medieval Studies from 15 to 30 June. The subject of her research during this time, “Did the Pearl-Poet Write at the Court of Edward III?,” is part of her current book project, Feeling by the Book: The Work of the Pearl-Poet in the History of Emotion. This book presents a new hypothesis for the place of the Pearl-Poet in history, locating him at the court of Edward III and building a case that he is likely to have served as chaplain and poet-mentor to royalty, specifically to Prince Lionel, Duke of Clarence. Within this provisional context, the book explores how each of the poet’s four works, Pearl, Patience, Cleanness, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, function as affective scripts, eliciting and shaping emotion in ways that served particular personal and political aims for the royal family in the late 1350s and early 1360s. This earlier dating for the poems, which builds on the work of Cooke, Fein, and Ingledew, raises broad questions about early English literary history. If the Pearl-Poet wrote ca. 1360, at the centre of the English court, how might this alter and enrich current understandings of the history of English literature?

Dr. McNamer looks forward to conversations about this subject at the Centre for Medieval Studies; she will be in residence from June 15-30. Graduate students and faculty should feel free to contact her at mcnamer@georgetown.edu.

She will also deliver a paper related to this project, “God’s Hot Haste: The Power of Divine Disgust in Cleanness,” at the “Powerful Emotions/Emotions and Power” conference co-sponsored by the University of York and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 28-29 June.

 

Powerful Emotions/ Emotions and Power c.400-1850 (28-29 June 2017)

Powerful Emotions/ Emotions and Power c.400-1850

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Dates: 28‒29 June 2017
Venue: Humanities Research Centre, Berrick Saul Building, University of York

This interdisciplinary conference is jointly organised by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and the Centres for Medieval Studies, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies at the University of York.

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Registration is now open.

CMS Annual Progression Workshop 2-4pm, Tuesday 23 May (K/111)

The CMS Annual Progression Workshop will take place on 23 May 2017 and will feature three first-year PhD students talking about their research projects:

  • Lauren Stokeld, “The Language of Built Structures in Medieval English from the Earliest Texts up to 1250”
  • Luke Giraudet, “An Anonymous 15th Century Parisian Journal: Civic Community and the Individual at the Time of French Civil War and English Occupation”
  • Tim Wingard, “Queering the Medieval Animal and Animalising the Medieval Queer: Animals and Transgressive Sexuality in Late Medieval England”

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All staff and MA and PhD students are warmly invited to come along and to support – there will be cake!

When: 23 May 2017, 2-4pm
Where: K/111

THE BRITISH LIBRARY @ The Centre for Medieval Studies (Monday 12 June 2017)

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Join us for two exciting events with Dr Kathleen Doyle (Lead Curator for Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library) and Dr Scot McKendrick (Head of Western Heritage Collections at the British Library)

 

Seminar on Public Engagement 11.30-12.30 | Huntingdon Room, King’s Manor

Drawing on examples from their recent publications, co-curated exhibitions and outreach work at the British Library, Kathleen Doyle and Scot McKendrick will discuss how to present specialist knowledge to a general audience. This will be a unique opportunity to learn more about wider issues of impact and public engagement.

The seminar is free and open to all, and will be followed by an informal lunch with the speakers open to CMS staff and students.

Book a free ticket via Eventbrite.

Festival of Ideas Event 18.30-19.20 | Ron Cooke Hub, Heslington East

For two millennia the Bible has inspired the creation of art. Within this legacy of remarkable art and beauty, illuminated manuscripts of the Bible offer some of the best evidence for our understanding of early Christian painting and artistic interpretations of the Bible.

Join Scot McKendrick and Kathleen Doyle, authors of The Art of the Bible: Illuminated Manuscripts from the Medieval World, as they discuss their book with a panel of experts from the University of York’s Centre for Medieval Studies and explore a selection of manuscripts from the treasures of the British Library.

Their book seeks to immerse readers in the world of illuminated manuscripts of the Bible, transporting them across one thousand years, passing through many of the major centres of the Christian world. Starting in Constantinople in the East, the journey takes you throughout Europe and beyond, including manuscripts from Lindisfarne, Mozarabic Spain, Crusader Jerusalem, northern Iraq, Paris, London, Bologna, Naples, Bulgaria, the Low Countries, Rome and Persia. The journey ends in Gondar, the capital of imperial Ethiopia.

Come along and immerse yourself in the richly illuminated manuscripts from the British Library at an accompanying 3Sixty exhibition and pose your own questions to the authors and panel.

Book a free ticket via the Festival of Ideas.

About the speakers

Dr Scot McKendrick is Head of Western Heritage Collections at the British Library where he has charge of manuscripts, archives, rare books, music and maps. He joined the Library in 1986 after reading Greats at Oxford and completing his postgraduate research at the Courtauld Institute of Art. During his long career at the Library he previously served as Head of Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts (2003-5), of Western Manuscripts (2006-10) and of History and Classics (2010-14). His publications include Illuminating the Renaissance: the Triumph of Flemish Manuscript Painting in Europe (2003), for which Thomas Kren and he won the Eric Mitchell and Eugène Baie prizes. Most recently he co-edited Codex Sinaiticus: New Perspectives on the Ancient Biblical Manuscript (2015).

Dr Kathleen Doyle is the Lead Curator, Illuminated Manuscripts in the Western Heritage Department of the British Library. Previously she was a Project Officer for the online Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library, from 2004-2007. Kathleen received her PhD in Medieval Art History from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, where her thesis focused on 12th century Cistercian manuscripts and the use of images in monastic art.

Scot and Kathleen collaborated on the AHRC-funded Royal Manuscripts project led by Scot, and the follow-on project led by Kathleen, editing and contributing articles to 1000 Years of Royal Books and Manuscripts (2013), and with Professor John Lowden, Royal Manuscripts: the Genius of Illumination (2011), which was short-listed for the William M.B. Berger Prize for British Art History (2012). On biblical manuscripts, together they have published Bible Manuscripts: 1400 Years of Scribes and Scripture (2007), and contributed to Sacred: Books of the Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity and Islam (2007).

 

Fragments of the Medieval World (April-July 2017)

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Samuel Storey Family Exhibition Gallery at the Borthwick Institute for Archives, April-July 2017

Many traces of the medieval world survive by chance as individual fragments separated from now-lost larger works. Spanning nearly 1000 years, this new exhibition tells their story – one of destruction, survival, and rediscovery to be appreciated and used anew in the 21st century.

This exhibition features fragments of medieval manuscripts generously donated to the Centre for Medieval Studies by Professor Toshiyuki Takamiya in 2014.

 

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